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Sleep deprivation increases diabetes risk

I love my sleep and thought this study sounded more like torture! :)

A small group of people where sleep deprived for 2 weeks in an experiment to see the impact sleep deprivation had on blood glucose levels and diabetes risk. Before I share the study and the results I thought this super quick video with sleep tips was great.


Video: 7 Drug-Free Sleep Tips to Try Tonight

This video is quick, only 24 seconds, so turn up the volume and listen carefully. The 7 handy tips listed in this video are all real changes you can make which will make a difference to your sleep tonight.


The sleep deprivation study

The study followed 11 volunteers with an average age of 39 and an average BMI (body mass index) of 26.5.

Each person had 2 weeks where they slept only 5.5 hours a night, then after a 3 month break they had a 2 week period where they slept 8.5 hours a night. During these 14 day periods the participants had unlimited food and minimal exercise.

The researchers wanted to mimic the classic Western lifestyle of ‘too much food, and too little exercise and sleep’. Before and after the study they had glucose tolerance testing to assess diabetes risk.


The study results …

  • BMI and weight increased during 2 weeks of lack of sleep. BMI increased by 0.7 points, and weight increased by 2.3 kg compared to the 2 weeks of long sleep.
  • The average 2-hour glucose tolerance test was higher in the lack of sleep weeks with values of 144 mg/dL, compared with an average of 132 mg/dL when bedtime was longer.
  • Insulin sensitivity was reduced with the short sleep. With 3.3 versus 4.0 mU/L/min.

The researchers concluded that lack of sleep, overeating and lack of exercise greatly increase the risk of impaired glucose metabolism and diabetes. The researchers from the University of Chicago published their study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.


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About Kellie

Kellie is 37 years old and together with her brother Steve makes up the My Health Software team.

She helps on the websites and gathering news for the programs. Kellie worked in the medical industry prior to having her two children (8 and 6) and has a strong interest in self awareness and management of health conditions.


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