logo logo

Why Chart Blood Pressure?

Your blood pressure changes throughout the day. Taking a single blood pressure reading is like taking a photo of a movie … you can see what is happening right now, but you miss out on the big picture.

Taking and charting one or two readings a day, over a period of time, gives you and your Doctor a more accurate picture of your true blood pressure.

Also, recent research shows that home monitoring blood pressure can actually reduce blood pressure. (see here for more information)

What is high blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the walls of the arteries. Every time the heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. The pressure is determined by the force and amount of blood pumped, and the size and flexibility of the arteries.

Blood pressure measurements contain two numbers. The top number is called systolic blood pressure and measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart pumps blood (contracts). The lower number is called the diastolic pressure and measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart relaxes.

High blood pressure or hypertension is a blood pressure reading where the systolic pressure is 140 or higher, or the diastolic pressure is 90 or higher.

Blood Pressure Category Systolic (mm Hg) Diastolic (mm Hg)
Normal 120 or less and 80 or less
Pre-hypertension 120-139 or 80-89
High – Stage 1 140-159 or 90-99
High – Stage 2 160 + or 100+

*American Heart Association recommended blood pressure levels.

How do I chart blood pressure?

The first step is to buy or borrow a blood pressure home monitor. The price of home blood pressure monitors has dropped over the past couple of years, and they are now very affordable. Most drug stores/pharmacies sell a range of monitors, and they are also available from online stores such as Amazon.

Once you have a blood pressure monitor, we have a fact sheet that you can print out or read online, that describes when and how to take readings.

Front Back
front back

When you take a reading, record the date and time of the reading, along with the systolic (higher), diastolic (lower) and pulse numbers. Also make notes, such as stress or medication changes.

We recommend trying our software for Windows that reminds you when it is time to take a reading, as well as making it easy to track your readings, chart them, as well as print a report for your doctor. Below is a blood pressure chart from the software:


Report of blood pressure readings
Click here to enlarge

What is this website?

My brother was diagnosed with severe hypertension in 2004. (Click here to read the story of how he found out he had hypertension). After a couple of months of home monitoring, he wrote a software program for Windows that made it easier to track the readings and automatically produced the charts, reports and averages that his Doctor wanted.

In 2005 I started working with my brother to promote home monitoring and the software. My brother’s health has improved markedly since 2004, so I have seen the benefits of home monitoring and getting high blood pressure under control.

Does your software create blood pressure charts?

Yes. If you have a Windows computer, you can download a free trial of the software and create charts from your readings. The software is designed to be easy to use, so no matter what your computer experience, the software can help you with your home monitoring.

To get started, Click here for step by step instructions.

bottom


bottom KellieMyHS

About Kellie

Kellie is 37 years old and together with her brother Steve makes up the My Health Software team.

She helps on the websites and gathering news for the programs. Kellie worked in the medical industry prior to having her two children (8 and 6) and has a strong interest in self awareness and management of health conditions.


bottom